We use our own and third-party cookies to optimize your experience on this site, including to maintain user sessions. Without these cookies our site will not function well. If you continue browsing our site we take that to mean that you understand and accept how we use the cookies. If you wish to decline our cookies we will redirect you to Google.
Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<9101112131415161718>> Total results:1776 References Per Page:

Flaws In France’s Food Waste Law Are Glaring

March 24, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
France’s year-old food waste law, which targeted supermarkets with fines for throwing out food that was edible or useable as animal feed, has been ineffective so far, according to consumer group QueChoisir. One key problem is a lack of government support across the supply chain. Supermarkets who have contracts with charities need better redistribution services, i.e., transportation services for collection and delivery of discarded food at the right times. They also need cooling facilities for the food, but these are expensive. The result? In the province of Isère, more than 75 percent of surplus foods never reach partner charities. The law also failed to set a minimum amount of surplus for donation. A supermarket that gives even one percent of its surplus food is in compliance. [ Image credit: © Wikipedia  ]
Louis Gore-Langton, "France's Food Waste Ban: One Year On", FOODnavigator.com, March 24, 2017, © William Reed Business Media SAS
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Market News
Regulation & Government
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
France

Procter & Gamble Donates $10,000 To ASU's Sustainability Project

March 23, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Procter & Gamble donated $10,000 to the Albany State University's Global Sustainability Project. Focusing on efforts worldwide to promote energy sustainability, the project highlights careers in mass communications that are related to global sustainability, such as environmental journalism. According to associate professor Jianchuan Zhou, the program also offers students the opportunity to study abroad and witness sustainability efforts in other countries.
Zachary Logan, "P&G Helps ASU Students Learn About Sustainability", WALB News, March 23, 2017, © WALB/ Raycom Media
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Nestle Shows How To run A Dairy Factory With Waste Water

March 22, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
To celebrate World Water Day recently, Nestlé issued a press release describing the water conservation efforts of one of its factories in Mexico. The Nestlé dairy facility became the company’s first “zero water” manufacturing site in the world. Located in the central, water-stressed state of Jalisco, the factory turned off the taps completely, transforming its water consumption from 1.6 million liters a day to zero. The factory no longer draws water from the ground or water mains. It gets all its water from the milk it processes. It takes fresh cow’s milk – 88 percent water – heats it at low pressure to remove some of its water content. The steam is condensed, treated and used to clean the evaporating machines. The water is collected again, purified and recycled again. [ Dairy factory in Mexico, image credit © Nestlé ]
"A Significant Drop", News release, Nestlé, March 22, 2017, © Nestlé
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Other
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Mexico

Pittsburgh-Area Food Businesses Know That Food Waste Is A Profit Issue

March 22, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
For a business, profit is a strong motivator, and when concern for profit dovetails with an environmental goal, the motivation is especially potent. In the Pittsburgh, Pa., area, the top chef at the Big Burrito Group is keenly aware that food waste is a bottom-line issue. Food tossed in the trash is a waste, not only of nutrition, but of dollars. Cooks at all 13 restaurants of the Burrito Group practice root-to-stem and tail-to-nose cooking. They gather scrap chicken carcasses and bones, leftover beef, and discarded fish bones and simmer them in water with vegetables to make stock. The basic idea of repurposing food scraps applies to retail grocery stores as well. The Pittsburgh-based Giant Eagle chain, for example, donates six million pounds of unsold food a year to food banks. [ Image credit: © Big Burrito Group  ]
Gretchen McKay, "Restaurants Cut Down on Food Waste to Help the Bottom Line", Pittsburgh (Pa.) Post-Gazette, March 22, 2017, © PG Publishing Co., Inc.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Kraft Heinz Sets Social Responsibility, Sustainability Targets

March 21, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
As part of its mission to become “the best food company,” Kraft Heinz has expanded a commitment to three goals it believes will have the greatest global impact: combatting global hunger and malnutrition, boosting supply chain sustainability and protecting the environment. It will strive to meet these goals by: donating a billion nutritious meals to needy people by 2021; buying palm oil products in an ethical, transparent and sustainable manner (and only 100 percent certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil); and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, energy, water and waste in its operations 15 percent globally by 2020 (baseline 2015).
"Kraft Heinz Strengthens Corporate Social Responsibility Commitments in Support of Vision to ‘Grow a Better World’", News Release, Kraft Heinz, March 21, 2017, © The Kraft Heinz Company
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Campaigns & Protests
Company News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Hotel Industry Joins WWF To Test Ways To Reduce Food Waste

March 21, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The hotel industry has joined with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to launch pilot projects testing ways to reduce food waste. Food production has the largest environmental footprint of any human activity, but a third of available food either spoils or is thrown out. Most food loss occurs in homes and the food service industries, including hotels. To combat the problem, the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA) is working with the WWF to develop actionable projects to prevent food waste through better food management. The effort is supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, as well as hotel chains Hilton, Hyatt, Marriott and others. [ Image credit: © Marriott Hotels ]
Susan McCarthy, "World Wildlife Fund, American Hotel & Lodging Association and The Rockefeller Foundation Bring Hotel Brands Together to Prevent Hotel Food Waste", News release, World Wildlife Fund, March 21, 2017, © World Wildlife Fund
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Natural and Organic Personal Care Products More Popular Among Parents And Younger People

March 20, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
More parents are buying personal care products that are natural and organic because they believe these are safer, healthier and better for the environment, according to a 2016 study by Mintel. Over one third of US consumers say they have bought more natural and organic personal care (NOPC) products in 2016 more than they did in the years prior and parents with children under18 lead this group. Additionally, more NOPC consumers (67%) than non-NOPC consumers (54%) believe they are trying to live a healthier lifestyle, showing that health and wellness is no longer just limited to diet and exercise.  Jana Vyleta, Health and Personal Care Analyst at Mintel said parents are more aware of ingredients they need to avoid because they are information seekers when it comes to raising their kids. Consumers know if a personal care product is natural or organic by looking at the types of ingredients and what certain ingredients are excluded, as well as product claims such as 'made with natural ingredients', 'no artificial ingredients', and 'contains organic ingredients'. Still, a large chunk of the consumer market needs to be convinced of NOPC products' health benefits as many consumers believe it is more costly and could be a marketing scheme.
"Parents Driving the US Natural and Organic Personal Care Market", Mintel, March 20, 2017, © Mintel Group Ltd.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

South Korea’s Strict Food Waste Program Is Paying Dividends

March 19, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Under South Korea’s food waste law, residents are required to separate food waste from garbage and to recycle food. Seoul used to spend $600 thousand dollars a day on food waste disposal. That money is now saved through recycling. Beginning in 2013 consumers in Seoul were required to pay for food waste by weight. The city set up a sophisticated system for tracking and weighing the waste that is placed in special bags (sold by the city) and then into bins that determine the fairly small fee to be charged. Since the law went into effect, the city’s food waste has decreased 10 percent – more than 300 tons a day. The Environmental Management Division wants to triple that amount over the next four years.
Mori Rothman et al., "These Policies Helped South Korea’s Capital Decrease Food Waste", PBS Newshour, March 19, 2017, © NewsHour Productions LLC
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Regulation & Government
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
South Korea

County Food Waste Composting Program Saves Real Money

March 17, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Residents of a Massachusetts county are able to trade scrap food for compost in a program that includes seven towns. The scrap food is emptied into a dumpster at a transfer station, then trucked to a farm. Composting takes about four months, after which residents can buy it for use in organic gardens. The county learned years ago that trash disposal is expensive, so whatever can be composted or recycled saves the towns – and its citizens – money. It’s also a better option than home composting, which should not add animal products such as meat, bones, dairy, and fats like peanut butter and mayonnaise. Decomposing meats, fats and dairy smell bad and attract pests. And they produce anaerobic bacteria that interfere with normal composting. [ Image credit: © Franklin County Solid Waste Management District  ]
Aviva Luttrell, "Area Composters Encourage Making Good Use of Food Waste", The (Franklin County, Mass.) Recorder, March 17, 2017, © The Recorder
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Organic Bread Brand Provides Detailed Ingredient Source Info To Consumers

March 16, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Thirty-five-year-old Rudi's Organic Bakery, owned by Hain Celestial, has launched two breads that provide consumers detailed information about the source of the grain in each loaf. The traceability information comes thanks to a partnership with Community Grains, which gathers information from the local farmer suppliers. Community Grains monitors each step of flour production, from sourcing seed, growth through harvest, and preservation of nutrients and flavor with whole milling. The two new Rudi’s breads are certified USDA organic and use only organic cracked wheat, organic rolled oats and organic sunflower oil, all without genetically modified organisms (GMOs). [ Image credit: © Rudi's Organic Bakery ]
"Rudi's Organic Bakery® Launches New Traceable Organic Bread Line with Community Grains", News release, Hain Celestial, March 16, 2017, © Hain Celestial
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Market News
Product News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Iowa Municipality Implements Curbside Food Waste Pickup Program

March 13, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Residents of Iowa City, Iowa, are now allowed to put food waste, including meat and eggs, as well as uncoated paper products, into 35-gallon waste bins – they hold up to 50 pounds – marked with special stickers for curbside pickup. Iowa City officials hope to divert some of the 18,000 tons of food waste that end up in city landfills to composting facilities. The town has been composting food waste since 2007, getting about 600 tons a year from various sources, including the University of Iowa dining halls and hospitals. Officials expect the new curbside program will add another 500 to 1,000 tons a year. [ Food waste bin, image credit: © City of Iowa City  ]
Erin Jordan, "Food Waste Joins Curbside Composting in Iowa City", The Gazette (Iowa City, IA), March 13, 2017, © The Gazette
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Consumers
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Antibiotics-Free Cattle, Pigs Could Be Next, But It’s More Complicated

March 12, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The antibiotics-free chicken movement may have caught on big in the U.S. – about half of chicken sold is free of antibiotics – it hasn’t spread to pork or beef. But that may change soon, as advocates pressure companies to reduce or eliminate antibiotics use in cattle, pigs, and turkeys. Tyson already plans to move in that direction, though it’s more complicated because, unlike in-house chicken production, food companies have to contract with beef and pork producers. And some, like Sanderson Farms, deny there’s a connection between antibiotics use in animal raising and increased resistance to antibiotics in humans. But industry analysts say they’re missing the point. Antibiotics-free meat offers a new way to sell pricier products. [ Image credit: © Wikipedia ]
"Antibiotic-Free Meat Gets a Foothold in US", The Express Tribune, March 12, 2017, © The Express Tribune
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Rotisserie Chicken Chain Pledges Antibiotics-Free Chicken By March 2018

March 10, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Add Boston Market to the list of restaurant chains committed to serving only antibiotics-free chicken. The company says that by July 2017, 75 percent of its chickens will have been raised without the drugs; within a year all of its chickens will be raised without the drugs. Boston Market unveiled a “quality guarantee” in January that states it will serve all natural, fresh, whole chickens that are U.S.-farm raised without added hormones or steroids,100 percent antibiotic-free, MSG free, and gluten free. [ Image credit: © Boston Market ]
"Boston Market Commits To Serving 100 Percent Antibiotic-Free Rotisserie Chicken", News release, Boston Market, March 10, 2017, © Boston Market
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Great Brownies, Cookies, And A Progressive Hiring Policy

March 8, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
New York’s Greyston Bakery is launching a line of “grab-and-go” cookies baked without preservatives, and with cage-free eggs and fair trade sugar. Greyston is already famous for its brownies, which are the key ingredient in Ben & Jerry’s Chocolate Fudge Brownie ice cream. The new cookie line features Harvest Cookies and Chocolate Chunk Cookies, sold, like the brownies, exclusively at Whole Foods Market stores. Greyston is also noted for its impact on the community. The company has an open hiring policy: it hires people with barriers to employment, no questions asked. CEO Mike Brady says, “We don’t hire people to bake cookies, we bake cookies to hire people.” Its partnership with Whole Foods Market has created 20 full-time positions at the bakery, [ Image credit: © Greyston Bakery ]
Kerry Sesil, "Greyston Launches New Cookies at Whole Foods Market®, Expands Job Impact", Specialty Food Association, March 08, 2017, © Specialty Food Association, Inc.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

School’s Composter Teaches Environmental Lessons While Reducing Food Waste

March 7, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A school in Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) has installed a food composter that “digests” as much as 200 pounds of food waste a day – not including avocado pits and beef bones. Since November the small, quiet machine has processed 7,000 pounds, turning the waste into non-potable water. The Power Knot Liquid Food Composter uses food-grade plastic pellets with enzymes that help break down the food as it’s agitated in water. Major benefits of the machine: it has so far reduced the school’s trash disposal fees of about $1,400 by $300; it has kept a lot of food waste out of the landfill where decomposition would have created methane gas; and it teaches environmental lessons in recycling and ecology to the students. The water produced is drained away and can be used to water lawns and gardens. [ Liquid Food Composter, image credit: © Power Knot  ]
Sarah Peters, "How a Gardens School’s Lunch Leftovers are Being Converted to Water", PalmBeachPost.com, March 07, 2017, © Cox Media Group
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Consumers
Efficiency & Business Processes
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

New Orleans Libraries Serve As Collection Points For Kitchen Waste

March 5, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Two public libraries in New Orleans offer residents the chance to dispose of their food waste – leftover vegetable peels and cuts, coffee grounds, etc. – by dropping them off to be picked up for composting by a local farm. The two libraries have collected more than a ton of food waste since the program was launched in January. Residents are asked to place the leftover scraps in paper bags or compostable bags, or in reusable containers, and freeze them before bringing them to the libraries. [ Image credit: © Alastair M. Robinson  ]
Ann Maloney, "Bring Your Food Waste to the Library for Composting: Yes, really", The New Orleans Times-Picayune, March 05, 2017, © NOLA Media Group
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

New Line Of Prepared Frozen Fruits, Vegetables Helps Reduce Food Waste

March 2, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
British supermarket chain Tesco has launched a range of prepared frozen produce designed to take the "fuss” out of cooking with unusual but antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, including pomegranates, watermelon, coconut and beetroot (beets). Sold in resealable packages are frozen diced beetroot and coconut, chunks of watermelon, and seeded pomegranate. The range will also help reduce food waste because consumers take what is needed and leave the rest in the freezer, Tesco says.  [ Image credit: © Tesco ]
"Tesco Addresses Food Waste with Fuss-Free Frozen Fruit", Food Ingredients 1st, March 02, 2017, © CNS Media BV
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Dunkin’ Donuts Parent Company To Replace Synthetic With Natural Colorings

March 2, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
As part of an ongoing plan to offer cleaner menu labels, the parent company of Dunkin’ Donuts and Baskin-Robbins said it will replace artificial colorings in its foods with naturally-sourced colorings by the end of 2018. Dunkin' Brands Group said its doughnuts unit will remove synthetic colors from donut icings, fillings, toppings, frozen beverages, baked goods, breakfast sandwiches and coffee flavorings. Likewise, Baskin-Robbins will remove synthetic colors from all ice cream, syrups, sauces, sprinkles and beverages. In 2014, Dunkin' Brands revamped its new product development process to focus on reformulating products to simplify ingredient labels, and reduce sodium and sugar content without sacrificing flavor.
"Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins Plan to Remove Artificial Colorings from U.S. Menus by End of 2018", News release, Dunkin' Brands Group, March 02, 2017, © Dunkin' Brands Group
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Bottled Water Giants Partner To Speed Biomass-Based Bottle To Market

March 2, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
French food company Danone is partnering with Nestlė Waters and a young technology company to accelerate commercial use of a 100 percent sustainable and renewable bio-based plastic bottle. The two giants in bottled water are working with a Sacramento, Calif.-based startup known as Origin Materials, which developed the technology. Together, the NaturALL Bottle Alliance will develop and launch commercially a PET1 (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic bottle made from biomass feedstocks, such as previously used cardboard and sawdust. A major advantage is that it does not divert resources or land from food production. [ Image credit: © Steven Depolo ]
"Danone and Nestlé Waters Launch NaturALL Bottle Alliance with California Startup to Develop 100% Bio-Based Bottles", News release, Nestlé Waters, March 02, 2017, © Nestlé Waters
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Consumer Goods Forum Draws Closer To Meeting Goals In Latest Health And Wellness Report

March 1, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The Consumer Goods Forum (CGF), a global network of business stakeholders from 70 countries with a mission to help accomplish health and wellness-related Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations by implementing Health and Wellness Resolutions, released its the fourth edition of its Annual Health and Wellness Progress Report. CGF noted progress in the Commitments signed by its members: the first commitment is for greater transparency in nutritional policies and product formulation and the second commitment is to implement better employee health and wellness programs. Of the companies that participated in the CGF survey over the last two years, 38% has met the first commitment and 66% achieved the second the commitment. The CGF notes that larger companies worldwide are demonstrating leadership in meeting their health and wellness goals and are inspiring other members to move forward. The report provides comprehensive information on the progress of health and wellness programs across the world. It reveals that some 2.3 billion people and 30,000 communities have been reached by H&W programs, with 1.3 million employees, 1.4 million H&W professionals and 386,000 schools participating in its implementation. Interestingly, some 180,000 products have been redesigned to align with the H&W resolutions of member companies. [Image credit © The Consumer Goods Forum]
"Health & Wellness Progress Report", The Consumer Goods Forum, March 01, 2017, © Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Research & Findings
Geographies
Worldwide

Toronto Festival Showcased Foods, Beverages Made From Landfill-Bound Ingredients

March 1, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A Toronto brewer has launched a food festival whose goal is to raise awareness of, and perhaps help reduce, the $31 billion in food wasted every year in Canada, nine percent of it in restaurants. The goal of the first Trashed & Wasted food festival, held in early March n Toronto, was to get people to rethink how they approach kitchen scraps. A secondary goal was to raise funds for a food collection organization that works with community agencies. At the festival, chefs created dishes from rescued food, while local brewers and distillers concocted beverages using ingredients that would normally be considered garbage. Another local craft brewery, for example, made a special beer for the festival using leftover bread from a Toronto bakery. [ Image credit: ©  Rainhard Brewery ]
Andrea Chiu, "Toronto Food Festival Seeks to Change How People Approach Kitchen Scraps", The (Toronto) Globe and Mail, March 01, 2017, © The Globe and Mail Inc.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Tyson Foods Includes Antibiotics-Free Chicken In Its Sustainability Strategy

February 23, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Tyson Foods CEO Tom Hayes, who told analysts recently that his company’s purpose is to “raise the world’s expectations for how much good food can do,” announced it would sell only chicken raised with “no antibiotics ever” (NAE). The NAE commitment is part of the company’s overall, long-term “holistic” sustainability strategy that includes cutting down workplace injuries and illness by 15 percent, and seeking strategic alliances for scientific sustainability. The company also plans to continue auditing third-party chicken farms to ensure humane treatment of chickens. Tyson processes more than 41 million chickens a week on average.
"Tyson Foods Commits to Make Antibiotic-Free Chicken Products", Food and Business Review, February 23, 2017, © FBR
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Food Waste Trends Need To Be Reversed To Ensure Global Food Security

February 21, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A study by British researchers concluded that reducing food waste in production and consumption would improve global food security – i.e., the goal of universal access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food. People should be encouraged to eat fewer animal products because around 1.1 billion tons of harvested crops are used to produce 240 million tons of meat, milk and eggs. People should be encouraged to eat only what they need to have adequate nutrition: currently people eat ten percent more food than needed. Nine percent of food produced is thrown away or left to spoil. Half of food produced is lost to inefficiencies in production and consumption. Unless the trends are reversed, greenhouse gas emissions will increase, water supplies will be depleted, and food security will decline. [ Image credit: © Foerster Wikimedia ]
Peter Alexander et al., "Losses, inefficiencies and waste in the global food system", Agricultural Systems, February 21, 2017, © Alexander et al.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Waitrose Supermarket Chain Is In The Avant Garde Of Food Waste Handling

February 17, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
British supermarket chain Waitrose has been a pioneer in preventing and repurposing food waste. Five years ago it stopped sending waste to landfills. Surplus food that can’t be donated to charities is used to generate electricity. And it sells wonky (misshapen or ugly) produce at a discount. The chain has taken the program another step forward: its new fleet of delivery trucks runs on fuel made from food leftovers. The company’s ten eco-friendly trucks can travel 500 miles on the food-waste fuel, which is cheaper than diesel and emits about 70 percent less carbon dioxide. Waitrose chose waste-based gas after researching biodiesel (too expensive) and electricity (batteries too heavy, recharge time too long)
Adele Peters, "These Grocery Delivery Trucks Are Powered By Food Waste", Fast Company, February 17, 2017, © Mansueto Ventures, LLC
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

The Body Shop Cuts Ties With The Daily Mail Over Editorial Stance

February 16, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Citing concerns on The Daily Mail's comments on human rights, L’Oréal-owned beauty retailer, The Body Shop, announced it does not have any partnership with the tabloid and has no plans to advertise with it.  The firm noted that The Daily Mail's editorial stance is going against The Body Shop's "Enrich Not Exploit Commitment" but declined to comment on whether its decision affects other publications, including The Sun and Daily Express, or specifically which editorial stance it was concerned about. The Body Shop had been running voucher promotions on the front page of the Mail and Mail on Sunday. The move comes in the midst of a campaign for ethical advertising by the group Stop Funding Hate which criticized tabloid newspapers over their coverage of Europe's refugee crisis and other social issues. In November, Lego Group also announced it had ended its relationship with the Mail. [Image credit © Stop Funding Hate]
George Bowden , "The Body Shop Becomes Latest Company To Cut Ties With The Daily Mail Over ‘Human Rights’ Concerns", The Huffington Post UK, February 16, 2017, © AOL (UK) Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Marketing & Advertising
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Food Manufacturers Simplify Safety And Quality Labels On Grocery Items

February 16, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The two largest trade groups for America’s grocery industry say they have adopted standardized, simplified, voluntary regulations to make product date labels clearer to the average consumer. The situation contributes to food waste because as many as 91 percent of consumers interpret a "use by" label (or no label at all) as a food safety warning and discard perfectly safe foods. Food manufacturers now use 10 different label phrases: for example, "expires on" and "better if used by." These would be replaced by just two: "use by" and "best if used by." “Use by” indicates when perishable foods are no longer safe to eat. "Best if used by" is a subjective guess regarding the date of optimum food quality: the point of peak flavor according to the manufacturer. Changes won’t be effective until July 2018. [ Image credit: © General Mills ]
Caitlin Dewey, "You’re About to See a Big Change to the Sell-By Dates on Food", The Washington Post, February 16, 2017, © The Washington Post
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Regulation & Government
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

College Student Has Big Plans For Her Family Farm’s Waste Mushrooms

February 13, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A British university student with a passion for profitably managing family-owned farms is pushing forward her idea to turn waste woodland mushrooms into a premium beer. Harriet Livesey, whose family's farm grows the mushrooms, recently won a scholarship she will use to start a business that – in addition to making beer – will train farmers to be “business-minded:” specifically, how to diversify, develop, progress, and make the most of their resources profitably. The scholarship will support her financially as she launches her own enterprise brewing artisan shiitake beer from waste mushrooms. She will need to carry out primary market research, attend brewery courses, research micro-brewing processes, identify market trends, and design and develop her brand. [ Image credit: © Pam Brophy  ]
Fiona Dryden, "Student Hoping Mushroom Beer Idea Takes Off", Leicester Mercury, February 13, 2017, © Local World
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Ingredients
Product News
Research & Findings
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Target Adds More Brands To Collection Of Natural Beauty Products

February 10, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Target is expanding its natural beauty care collections by adding more natural beauty brands, including Alaffia, Little Seed Farm, and Nubian Heritage, to the lineup. With millennial consumers showing preference for healthy and natural beauty options, the retailer seeks to position itself as their first choice for affordable natural beauty products. As part of this initiative, Target aims to achieve full ingredient transparency for beauty, personal care, baby care, and household care products by 2020. Target is requiring suppliers to remove toxic and dangerous ingredients, such as phthalates, propylparaben, and butylparaben, from their products.
Rachel Brown, "Target Boosts Selection of Natural Beauty Products", Women’s Wear Daily, February 10, 2017, © Penske Media Corporation
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Market News
Marketing & Advertising
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

German Grocery Store Sells Only Wonky Produce, Expired And Surplus Foods

February 6, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A grocery store that sells only ugly or surplus food products, from vegetables to beer, has opened in the German city of Köln (Cologne). The founders of The Good Food grocery store are dedicated to the idea of eliminating food waste in the world. It is the first such store to open in Germany, and the third in the EU. The store is unusual for a couple of reasons. The food it sells was otherwise bound for landfills because it may be misshapen, or too large or too small, or past its sell-by date. This includes non-perishable products from big manufacturers. And there are no fixed prices: consumers decide how much the products are worth. [ Image credit: © The Good Food bei RTL Aktuell ]
Irene Banos Ruiz, "First German Supermarket Sells Waste Food Only", Deutsche Welle, February 06, 2017, © Deutsche Welle
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Product News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Germany

Clean Label Frozen Treats May Lead To Sales Growth

February 6, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The food industry has gotten the message from consumers that sugary, nutrition-free and calorie-packed ice cream is no longer acceptable They are now making healthier, “yet still decadent,” frozen treats, says researcher Packaged Facts. Today there are a growing number of ice creams and frozen desserts that eschew soy, gluten, artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives, and genetically modified ingredients, not to mention much less fat and sugar. Some of the new products are organic. Consumers are apparently pleased with the results. Ice cream and other frozen treats are a mature market – 85 percent of households buy ice cream routinely. Sales have been steady in recent years. But Packaged Facts says the new attention being paid to clean label frozen desserts could spark a revival of sales growth. 
""Free From" Ice Cream Trending in $28 Billion Market", News release, Packaged Facts, February 06, 2017, © Packaged Facts
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

A Closer Look At Major Food Retailer, Restaurant Chain Clean Label Policies

February 1, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A consumer watchdog organization has analyzed the clean label initiatives of four big restaurant chains and nine supermarket chains finding that all have committed to excluding additives, such as synthetic food dyes and artificial sweeteners like aspartame. Except Whole Foods, the supermarket chains have limited their commitments to one or more lines of their house-brand products, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). Other findings: none of the clean label lists limit sodium or added sugars; all exclude many artificial ingredients that CSPI considers safe; and restaurant policies do not include “riskiest” beverage ingredients such as added sugars, artificial sweeteners, and synthetic food colors. One interesting CSPI observation: “clean label products are not necessarily healthful.” 
Lisa Lefferts, "Clean Labels: Public Relations or Public Health?", Report, Center for Science in the Public Interest, February 01, 2017, © CSPI
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Hormel Investigates Pig Supplier Accused Of Animal Cruelty

January 31, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A video created by an animal rights group showing alleged cruelty to animals at an Oklahoma pig farm has spurred an investigation by Hormel Foods Corp., which buys meat from the farm. The company also suspended operations at the Maschhoffs farm. The two-minute video shows dozens of pigs and piglets confined in crowded spaces without benefit of veterinary care. Hormel said it would send third-party auditors to investigate the claims made by Mercy for Animals in the video. [ Image credit: © Hormel ]
S. Sangameswaran, "Hormel Stops Operations at Supplier Farm After Video Shows Animal Abuse", Reuters, January 31, 2017, © Reuters
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Regulation & Government
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Company’s Cage-Free Eggs Showcased In Inflatable, Transparent Carton

January 30, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A Taiwanese egg company committed to cage-free eggs has developed a special packaging technology that showcases the health and freedom of its products. The new egg carton is made of a transparent PVC material that inflates to cushion individual eggs. The eggs from Happy Egg company are available in purse-shaped packs of three, or in individual packs decorated especially for local festivals and events, such as birthdays, Christmas and Chinese New Year. [ Inflatable egg carton, Image credit: © Packagingoftheworld.com ]
"Inflatable Egg Carton Promotes Cage-Free Eggs", Springwise, January 30, 2017, © Springwise Intelligence Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Product News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Taiwan

App Helps Volunteers Find, Deliver Salvageable Food Donations

January 25, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Add to the list of technologies created to help reduce food waste an Uber-like app from a Pittsburgh, Pa.- based nonprofit known as 412 Food Rescue. Food Rescue Hero, available free on iTunes and Google Play, helps its 1,000 volunteer drivers (or walkers or cyclists) find salvage food considered unmarketable and deliver it to shelters and charities. Hero lists salvage opportunities at grocery stores and restaurants and the target charities who distribute the food, provides details on the donations, and lets volunteers pick the donation that works best for them. There is even a navigation system that guides volunteers to the pick-up locations and destinations.  [ Image credit: © 412foodrescue.org  ]
Dana Cizmas, "412 Food Rescue Mobilizes Volunteers with Uber-Like App", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, January 25, 2017, © PG Publishing Co., Inc.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Innovation
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

London Restaurant Chain Tests Produce Preservation Technology

January 25, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A new technology that could cut down on food waste is being tested in a small chain of London restaurants. The innovation is essentially a small rectangular filter sheet that is placed on or next to fresh fruit and vegetables to absorb ethylene gas produced by ripening produce. (Ethylene is also used commercially to speed the ripening of green tomatoes, bananas, etc.) Canteen restaurants hopes the technology will extend the shelf-life of its produce and reduce the amount that is routinely tossed away after over-ripening. [ Image credit: © It's Fresh ]
Francesca Gillett, "London Restaurant Canteen Trials New Food Waste Technology to Keep Food Fresher for Longer", Evening Standard, January 25, 2017, © Evening Standard Ltd.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Pop-Up Restaurant At Selfridges To Offer Meals Created From Surplus Foods

January 24, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
U.K. department store Selfridges is operating a rooftop pop-up food waste restaurant for a month featuring “reinterpretations” of classic British foods like cabbage cores, cover crop sprouts and pork from waste-fed pigs. The restaurant, sponsored by U.S. consumer electronics firm Sonos and digital music provider Spotify, follows a format created by Manhattan chef Dan Barber. The temporary eatery will take surplus foods from farmers, fishermen, distributors, butchers, artisanal producers and retailers to create a full menu with daily specials. It will also serve special cocktails and offer a “tea experience” created by pastry chefs.
Emma Weinbren, "Selfridges to Launch Pop-Up Food Waste Restaurant Wasted", The Grocer, January 24, 2017, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Hellman’s Fulfills Cage-Free Egg Pledge Three Years Early

January 23, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Mayonnaise maker Hellman’s, a Unilever brand, announced that after a reorganization of its egg supply chain – involving 331 million eggs annually – all of its mayonnaise and dressings brands are now made with eggs from cage-free hens. The change in U.S. brands comes three years ahead of the company’s commitment announced in 2010. It affects 170 million jars, 30 million squeeze bottles, and 1.3 million egg-laying hens annually. A Humane Society spokesman said “Hellmann's move shows just how in synch the company is with its customers."  [ Image credit: ©  Wikimedia Commons ]
"Hellmann's Mayonnaise And Mayonnaise Dressings Now Use 100% Cage-Free Eggs In The U.S.*, Three Years Ahead Of Schedule", News release, Unilever U.S., January 23, 2017, © Hellman's U.S.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Head & Shoulders Introduces Shampoo Bottle Made From Recycled Plastic

January 19, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Procter & Gamble said its Head & Shoulders haircare brand will start using a recyclable shampoo bottle made from up to 25 percent recycled beach plastic. Developed in partnership with recycling firms TerraCycle and SUEZ, the shampoo bottle will be launched in France in summer 2017 as a limited-edition Head & Shoulders packaging exclusive to Carrefour customers. Also, P&G said that by end of 2018, in Europe, more than 500 million bottles per year will include as much as 25 percent post-consumer recycled plastic.
"P&G’s Head & Shoulders Creates World’s First Recyclable Shampoo Bottle Made with Beach Plastic", Procter & Gamble, January 19, 2017, © Procter & Gamble
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Product News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Grocery Chain Partners With Company That Sells “Wonky” Produce

January 18, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A Midwestern grocery chain has decided its customers are ready for “ugly” – and cheaper – fruits and vegetables. All 242 stores in the Hy-Vee Inc. family have begun to sell what is sometimes called “wonky” produce that is usually discarded because it is misshapen. Hy-Vee is working with large produce company Robinson Fresh and will offer Robinson’s Misfits line of imperfect produce. Misfits produce is sold at a lower price, benefiting customers while helping to reduce produce waste. [ Image credit: © Hy-Vee Inc.  ]
"Hy-Vee introduces 'ugly' produce to fight food waste", News release, Hy-Vee , January 18, 2017, © Hy-Vee Inc.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Product News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Europe’s Lawmakers Back Aggressive Approach To Recycling, Landfilling, Food Waste

January 18, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The environmental panel of the European Parliament amended a draft legislative “waste package” to raise waste recycling from 44 percent to 70 percent and reduce landfilling to five percent. The Environment Committee also voted to reduce food waste by 50 percent by 2030. Forty-two organizations in 15 countries support the aggressive new proposals; 47,000 people have signed petitions backing them.  The new targets would be legally binding among member countries. The committee’s package will be put to a vote by the full House at the March 13-16 plenary session in Strasbourg.  [ European Parliament; image credit: © Rama  ]
Rebecca Smithers, "Campaigners Call on EU to Halve Food Waste by 2030", The Guardian, January 18, 2017, © Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Regulation & Government
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Unilever To Use 100% Recyclable Plastic Packaging By 2025

January 14, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Unilever said all of its plastic packaging will be fully reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025. In the next three years, Unilever will be reducing the weight of its plastic packaging by 30%, a commitment given under its Sustainable Living Plan.  The company also announced it has renewed its membership to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation (EMF) and will continue supporting the New Plastics Economy Initiative as part of its contribution to the Sustainable Development Goal 12 that focus on sustainable consumption and production. Unilever CEO Paul Polman called on the consumer goods industry to move towards a circular economy. Polman said the industry needs to do much more to help make sure plastic is managed responsibly and efficiently post-consumer use. According to EMF, only 14% of plastic packaging used globally is recycled, while 40% ends up in landfill and a third in fragile ecosystems. [Image credit © Nick White]
"Unilever commits to 100% recyclable plastic packaging by 2025", Unilever, January 14, 2017, © Unilever
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

LVMH Pushing To Make Its Operations More Sustainable

January 11, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Even luxury brands are concerned about moving toward more sustainable production processes and LVMH has made significant progress. It has a corporate framework, LIFE (LVMH Initiatives for the Environment), that address nine environmental challenges. Its assessment takes a full life cycle perspective and each brand’s strategic plan now folds in a LIFE plan that includes five year actions and targets. One of the more innovative elements centers on the company’s carbon reduction strategy. It requires all of its brand houses to spend €15/ton carbon emitted on abatement or related research efforts. In the first year of the program the company invested some €6 million behind this effort. LVMH is communicating its sustainable credentials through using a distinctive symbol a “Butterfly Mark,” which is a first in the luxury industry. [Image credit © Cultura RF]
Andrew Winston, "An Inside View of How LVMH Makes Luxury More Sustainable", Harvard Business Review, January 11, 2017, © Harvard Business School Publishing
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe

Indian Restaurant In Scotland Charges Fee For Wasted Buffet Food

January 11, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
New environmental rules in Scotland require food waste from large restaurants to be recycled. Private refuse services charge fees for emptying recycling bins. To keep the fees manageable, a Dundee Indian restaurant has begun charging customers who leave too much food on their plates after the all-you-can-eat buffet. The £2 per person fee is addded to the £14.99 price of the meal. Management of Taza Indian Buffet realized it was tossing away about 600 kg of uneaten food every week. Now, when customers are seated, they are given a menu and a measuring card with a four-inch square cut out of the middle to measure leftovers. The card explains that the £2 fee will be charged if leftovers don’t fit within the square.  [ Image credit: © Taza Indian Buffet  ]
Gavin Madeley et al., "Eat Up or Face a Fine! All-You-Can-Eat Indian Restaurant Starts Imposing Penalties on Diners Who Leave Too Much after Growing Tired of Throwing Away 600kgs of Leftovers a Week", Mail Online, January 11, 2017, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Consumers
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Startup Turns Unsold Fruits, Vegetable Into Hummus

January 11, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A food waste-focused start-up is transforming leftover fruit and vegetables into a variety of flavored hummus products, and is using crowdfunding to pay for expansion into new markets. Hannah McCollum’s idea came when she noticed that current hummus products were bland and unhealthy, and tons of food was being wasted in the foodservice industry and in homes. She launched ChicP, which produces flavored dips using ugly or unmarketable vegetables rejected by supermarkets. The company offers several flavors, including banana and cocoa; beetroot, horseradish and sage; and carrot, ginger and turmeric. ChicP is using U.K. retailer Tesco's crowdfunding website to raise money to reach more retailers and suppliers in Europe and overseas. [ Hummus party; image credit: © ChicP ]
Emma Jane Cash, "Waste Not, Want Not: UK Start-Up Turns Leftover Food into Hummus", FOODnavigator.com, January 11, 2017, © William Reed Business Media SAS
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Product News
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Chinese Consumers Are Adapting Priorities As China Changes

January 10, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
In an interview, Delon Wang, Manager of Asia Pacific Trends at Mintel, warned that the rapid growth seen in China’s consumer goods industry might slow as economic growth decelerates and the population adapts priorities to the new China, focusing for example on buzzwords like ‘ancient’ and ‘old’. Mintel’s Global New Products Database indicates that product claims including the word "ancient” on packaging grew 56% in the first half of 2016 within China’s beauty and personal care and food and drink and categories. Wang said that consumers are demanding authenticity, and they are increasingly concerned about health and the environment. Value remains another key attribute for consumers. More consumers are also looking at opportunities to be entrepreneurs themselves in a bid to improve financial security during turbulent economic times, and many are choosing subscription purchasing for their fitness and beauty items. Brand loyalty is highest among the middle-class consumers (68% versus 50% for consumers overall). Other factors at work within China include technological advance – such as the Internet of Everything and smart devices – and retail innovation and evolution, such as pop-up stores.
Natasha Spencer, "China’s cosmetics and consumer trends in 2017 part I: A change of pace", Cosmetics Design, January 10, 2017, © William Reed Business Media SAS
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
China

Walmart CEO Sees Big Challenges Ahead For Retailers, And Big Opportunities

January 9, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Walmart CEO Doug McMillon believes strongly that retailers need to adapt quickly to rapidly advancing technologies that have accelerated the pace of modern living, particularly when it comes to shopping, purchasing, and taking delivery of products. These technologies will create unprecedented opportunities for retailers. Looking ahead 10 years, he says customers will be able to fulfill everyday needs easily through stores, e-commerce, pick-up, delivery, thanks to sophisticated technologies. Retailers will need to adjust to the fact that customers globally will see what people in other countries have, and will want it too. Lastly, embedded social and environmental sustainability will require tighter collaboration among retailers, NGOs, governments and educational institutions so that customers, associates/employees, shareholders, communities, and suppliers will all benefit. “I can’t think of a more exciting time to be in retail,” McMillon concluded.[Doug McMillon, Image credit: © Shane Bevel (Walmart corporate), Wikimedia  ]
Doug McMillon, "3 Predictions for the Future of Retail – from the CEO of Walmart", Blog entry, Walmart CEO, January 09, 2017, © Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Jennie-O Sausage Is Now Leaner, Cleaner

January 9, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Sausage-maker Jennie-O has changed the formulation of its turkey product to contain less fat (six grams) and less sodium. The company now claims the product is “all natural” with a “simple, clean ingredients” that include turkey, salt, sugar, spices and rosemary extract. In addition, the 110 calorie sausage is “minimally processed” and is free of BHT, BHA and other common preservatives. [ Image credit: ©  Jennie-O ]
"Jennie-O Introduces All Natural Turkey Sausage With Simple, Familiar Ingredients, No Preservatives", News release, Jennie-O, January 09, 2017, © Jennie-O
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Other
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Starbucks Puts Food Waste To Good Use In New Line Of Lattes

January 6, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Starbucks has introduced a new latte line that not only tastes good but is eco-friendly. The new espressos are flavored with a syrup made from the husks of coffee cherries that are normally discarded when the beans are harvested. The company uses the syrup to flavor the Cascara line – the Spanish word means “husk” or “shell” – that is subtly sweet with hints of maple and brown sugar without being fruity.  [ Coffee cherries; image credit: © Jonathan Wilkins  ]
Carly Stern, "Good to the Last Drop! Starbucks Unveils New Latte Made with the WASTE of a Coffee Plant - and It's Surprisingly Delicious", Mail Escapes, January 06, 2017, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Mass And Premium Continue To Drive Growth In Color Cosmetics

January 5, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
According to Euromonitor International, the color cosmetics market was worth US$57 billion globally in 2015, driven by growing incomes for women in growth markets like India and China. Nearly two-thirds of the market (64%) was mass products in which consumers came from across the income spectrum, with some consumers limited to the mass market through income constraints and others choosing mass options over premium, with a new wave of mass “fast fashion” cosmetics brands that align with trends and rely on high volumes. Premium continues to grow faster than mass, and Euromonitor expects to see a CAGR for the premium segment of 4% over the next five years, versus 3% for mass. It also expects North America to be the first majority-premium color cosmetics market by 2020. The color cosmetics market will continue to encounter broad consumer megatrends, for example in the form of sustainability and healthy living. And customization remains a major opportunity for brands in this category, with brands catering for different skin tones, religions and cultures.  
Hannah Symons, "Reinventing Colour Cosmetics through Novel Growth Concepts", Euromonitor International, January 05, 2017, © Euromonitor
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Mexico
Europe
Japan
Russia

Produce Distributor Renames Its Vegetable Trimmings And Sells Them As “SparCs”

January 5, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A Canadian company believes that renaming the edible trimmings of vegetable processing – carrot tops, snapped-off green bean stems, etc. – transforms them from trash to saleable food. In much the same way that slimehead fish were renamed orange roughy, vegetable trim was renamed “SparCs” (pronounced sparks), which is actually scraps spelled backwards with a little stylization. Produce and specialty foods distributor Baldor says its Fresh Cuts program offers pre-sliced, diced or otherwise prepared vegetable trimmings – branded as SparCs – that it has saved for human or animal consumption, and kept from the landfill.  [ Image credit: © Tim Jewett ]
Maura Judkis, "How One Company Eliminated Food Waste: The ‘Landfill can no Longer be an Option.’", The Washington Post, January 05, 2017, © The Washington Post
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America
<<9101112131415161718>> Total results:1776 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.