Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<12345678910>> Total results:1401 References Per Page:

Growing Public Awareness Will Make Food Waste A Major Issue In 2018

January 18, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Global food waste is a problem of staggering proportions. It encompasses edible food that is lost, left uneaten or thrown away; imperfect fruits and vegetables that are never sold; and edible food thrown away because it’s past its best-before date. However, growing awareness and concern about the issue might make 2018 the year when minimizing food waste becomes a bona fide movement. A surge in veganism reflects consumer concern not only about what we eat but whence it comes. Global educational campaigns are trying to raise awareness about waste. Food waste initiatives and sustainable practices campaigns are popping up all over, especially in the hotel and restaurant industry. “Public awareness is an important step in changing the food culture,” says sustainability expert Ivano Iannelli. [ Image credit: © Green-Mom.com  ]
Kevin Hackett, "Minimising Food Waste: A New Culinary Trend for 2018", The National, January 18, 2018, © International Media Investments FZ LLC
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Middle East- Africa
United Arab Emirates

Suntory Continues Investing In Company’s Biomass-Based Bottle Technology

January 18, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Suntory Holdings and N.Y.-based Anellotech, which produces cost-competitive chemicals and fuels from non-food biomass, partnered six years ago to build a 25-meter-tall TCat pilot plant that would produce bio-based beverage bottles. Now that the plant has been commissioned, Suntory has invested another $9 million in Anellotech to continue development of a fully bio-based PET beverage bottle. The $9 million is part of a $15 million commitment based on the company’s achievement of certain performance goals. The next step is to test process viability and the ability to scale up to commercial operation at the plant. TCat-8 technology produces the renewable aromatic hydrocarbons known as BTX (viz, benzene, toluene and xylene) made from wood and agricultural residues used to make plastics. Suntory hopes to integrate Anellotech's bio-bottles into its sustainability program.
Mary Ellen Shoup , "Suntory invests additional $9m in Anellotech to develop 100% bio-based plastic bottle", Beverage Daily, January 18, 2018, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Japan

Australian Technology Solves Food Waste, Creates New Products

January 16, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Banana-growing couple Rob and Krista Watkins have patented and trademarked a technology that turns any fruit or vegetable – but especially discarded, unmarketable produce – into powder in less than 25 minutes. The powder can be used to make any number of food products, including flour and cake pre-mixes, resistant starches, ointments, and vegan protein mixes. Vertically integrated Natural Evolution Foods in Queensland, Australia, uses its proprietary NutroLock technology – an in-line, cold, raw, low-speed food processing technique – to turn green bananas into flour and resistant starch. Its facility can produce eight tons of banana flour a week, with 10kg of bananas making 1kg of flour. [ Image credit: © North Queensland Register  ]
Sarah Hudson, "Natural Evolution Foods: Adding Value to Queensland Bananas", The Weekly Times, January 16, 2018, © News Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia

It’s Not Easy To Find Out Whether Meat Is Ethically Raised

January 15, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Americans are eating 50 pounds more meat per person than they did in 1960. An increasing number of them want to be certain their meat was ethically raised. But that’s not easy to do. Labels like “all natural” or “free range” on meat packages are no help, and few many consumers are likely to visit farms to observe animal husbandry practices. That’s where independent third-party certification comes in. Whole Foods Market, for example, requires its fresh meat to be certified through the nonprofit Global Animal Partnership, a somewhat expensive procedure that involves regular farm audits. Other third-party organizations that assure customers that the meat they are eating was ethically raised include Animal Welfare Approved, Certified Humane, and American Humane Certified, as well as the Non-GMO Project and Where Food Comes From, Inc. [  Image credit: © agrilicious.org  ]
Abigail Curtis, "You Want to Eat Meat That’s Been Ethically Raised. But How Can You Know for Sure?", Bangor Daily News, January 15, 2018, © Bangor Publishing Co.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Ingredients
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Food Company Shareholders Submit Antibiotics Resolutions

January 14, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Members of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility, a coalition of corporate investors, have each filed shareholder resolutions with three big food companies urging them to stop buying or producing meat raised with antibiotics. The resolutions submitted to McDonald’s Corp., Denny’s, and Sanderson Farms will be voted on at shareholder meetings unless challenged ahead of time. Last year, McDonald’s stopped buying chicken from suppliers who used antibiotics. The new resolution calls on the company to extend the practice to pork and beef. Rivals Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. and Panera Bread Co. already serve chicken, pork, and beef from animals raised without antibiotics.  [ Image credit: © ICCR  ]
Lisa Baertlein, "Investors Call on Sanderson, Denny's, McDonald's to Cut Antibiotics", Reuters, January 14, 2018, © Reuters
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Food Waste Start-Ups Face Four Key Organizational Challenges

January 11, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
A number of companies have launched in recent years to tackle the staggering problem of fruit and vegetable produce that never reaches the consumer’s shopping cart because it is deemed below commercial grade. Cosmetically challenged produce nevertheless retains intrinsic value: it is edible, nutritious, and marketable, at least somewhere. Though still small, companies like Imperfect Produce, Hungry Harvest, Full Harvest, and the new iPhone app goMkt, are pursuing solutions to the problem of delivering edible discarded food to the needy. More such initiatives are likely to emerge in the coming years. According to a university professor, each of these businesses faces four challenges: schematizing of quality distinctions to allow useful pricing; creating an efficient distribution system; nailing down liability issues when produce deteriorates prior to delivery; and ensuring profitability.  [ Image credit: © Hungry Harvest  ]
"Beneath the Bruises: A New Market for Old and Ugly Fruit and Vegetables Takes Shape", The Economist, January 11, 2018, © The Economist Newspaper Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Britvic Is Serious About Sustainability Goals

January 11, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
British beverage company Britvic unveiled sustainability plans that include short-term goals for manufacturing emissions, waste, and water use over the next two years. The company wants to cut CO2 by 15 percent from global manufacturing plants in the U.K., Ireland, France, and Brazil, between 2016 and 2020 by implementing greener bottling lines. The “A Healthier Everyday” sustainability initiative focuses on resource efficiency, minimizing the environmental impacts of its packaging, and operating a sustainable supply chain. The company says it already keeps 99 percent of its solid waste from landfills, and new bottling lines eliminated 300 tons of plastic packaging in 2017.
Michael Holder, "Thirsty Work: Britvic Freshens Up 2020 Sustainability Goals", Business Green, January 11, 2018, © Incisive Business Media (IP) Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Other
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Latin America
Europe
Brazil
United Kingdom
France
Ireland

Potato Chip Company Turns Ugly Spuds Into Gold

January 10, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Rather than discard potatoes deemed too small or too large or too blemished for regular potato chip production, Pennsylvania’s Dieffenbach Potato Chips has launched the “It’s Good to be Ugly” campaign to reduce waste and fight hunger. The campaign follows the launch of its Uglies Kettle Chips last year. The company works with local farmers to acquire surplus and blemished potatoes, which are cooked in small batches like its regular potatoes. A total of 350,000 pounds of potatoes have been kept from landfills since the launch of Uglies Kettle Chips last year, according to the company..  [ Image credit: © Dieffenbach's  ]
Gill Hyslop, "Ugly Chips are All the Rage in Fight against Food Waste in America", BakeryAndSnacks.com, January 10, 2018, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Regulation & Government
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Walton Family Invests In Colorado Food Waste Company

January 10, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
A Colorado-based start-up whose mission is to cut food waste by buying at a discount excess or rejected foods from supermarkets and selling it to foodservice companies has caught the eye of an investment arm of the billionaire Walton family. Foodmaven completed an $8.6 million fundraising round, including Walton money, to continue acquiring, for example, still edible frozen pizzas with a mistake on the box, excess chicken from supermarkets, and produce rejected for cosmetic reasons. FoodMaven has 700 customers in Colorado, including restaurants, hospitals, and large institutional cafeterias, and expects $10 million in revenue this year. [ Image credit: © Colorado Restaurant Assoc.  ]
Craig Giammona, "Second-Hand Pizza Seen as Next Big Thing by Richest U.S. Family", Bloomberg Quint, January 10, 2018, © Bloomberg L.P.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

RTD Drink Trends In 2018 Include Minimal Processing, Functional Ingredients

January 10, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Consumer demand will continue to rise in 2018 for perishable RTD beverages that are minimally-processed, contain little or no added sugar, are sweetened with natural ingredients, feature unusual flavors, and offer functional benefits. In play will be products that are cold pressed or cold brewed, often using high-pressure technologies that eliminate the need for ultra-high temperature pasteurization and aseptic processing. Look for functional ingredients that promote health in RTD coffees, teas, and juices, including antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, protein, prebiotics, and probiotics. New flavors expected to gain traction include: maple and honey, sour citrus, watermelon, carrot ginger turmeric (Natalie’s Orchid Island Juice), and mocktail spirit flavors like amaretto and whiskey (ArKay Beverages).
Donna Berry, "Freshness, Transparency to Propel Beverage Trends", Food Business News, January 10, 2018, © SOSLAND PUBLISHING COMPANY
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Ingredients
Product News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

British Fruit Farm Cotchel Juices Its Unsold Pears, Apples

January 8, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
On a mission to reduce food waste, British fruit juice company Cotchel has unveiled four variants of bottled apple and pear juice using fruits that can’t be otherwise marketed because they are too big, too small, or too ugly. The unsold apples and pears used to make the juices are grown, pressed and bottled on a family farm in Essex. They are sold in four versions, including Braeburn; Opal; Topaz and Evelina; and Conference, Topaz and Evelina. “Cotchel is all about creating a great-tasting fruit juice using fruit we can’t sell,” says farmer Pete Thompson, “and taking small steps towards reducing food waste.”
"Cotchel unveils four-strong juice range made with unwanted fruit", FoodBev , January 08, 2018, © FoodBev Media Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Ingredients
Market News
Product News
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Would Knowing What The USDA Means By “Natural” Make For Smarter Meat Buying?

January 4, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
New research from Arizona State University shows that food shoppers not only misinterpret labels on food products, they’re willing to pay a premium price for a “natural” steak without really knowing the USDA’s explanation of the term: no artificial ingredients or added color and only minimally processed. The online study of 663 beef-eaters tested their willingness to pay for steak labeled with different attributes, such as natural, grass-fed, or raised without growth hormones. Half were given the definition of natural, half were not. Uninformed consumers were willing to pay $1.26 more per pound for the “natural” beef, and $2.43 more for natural beef with no growth hormone. Informed consumers, however, were unwilling to pay a premium for the “natural” claim alone, but were willing to pay $3.07 more per pound for steak labeled as natural with no growth hormones. [ Image credit: ©  Arizona State University ]
Rebecca Ferriter, "Is 'Natural' Beef Label Misleading?", Arizona State University, January 04, 2018, © Arizona Board of Regents
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Ingredients
Marketing & Advertising
Other
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Dunkin’ Removes All Synthetic Dyes From Donuts

January 4, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Dunkin’ Donuts has removed all artificial dyes from its donuts in the U.S., almost a year before its original deadline. Calling the accomplishment ”an incredible milestone moment,” the company said it took years of research to make the transition to simpler donut ingredients and hopes to continue the trend with “innovative new flavors” in the months ahead. The company said it is on track to meet its end-of-2018 deadlines for removing synthetic dyes from its entire menu, including donut icings, fillings and toppings, and frozen beverages such as Coolatta frozen beverages, baked goods, breakfast sandwiches and coffee flavorings. Sister brand Baskin-Robbins is also working to remove synthetic dyes from its products. [ Image credit: © Dunkin' Donuts  ]
"To Ring in the New Year, Dunkin' Donuts Removes Artificial Dyes from Donuts", News release, Dunkin' Donuts, January 04, 2018, © Dunkin' Donuts
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Survey: Eating Healthful Foods Goes Hand In Hand With Clean Labels

January 4, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
A survey of 1,023 Americans by a product transparency advocacy group has found that two-thirds have made buying healthful or socially-conscious foods a priority in 2018, along with labels that are transparent regarding ingredient identification. The main emphasis will be on cutting down sugar consumption, with almost half saying they will eat less sugar or buy more “no sugar added” foods and beverages. According to Label Insight, the survey found that Americans want better-defined and more transparent food labels, especially ones that provide information they can better understand in 2018 (25 percent). Greater transparency into ingredients (14 percent) is another desire, along with and easier-to-identify “clean” or minimally processed products (14 percent).  [ Image credit: © Del Monte  ]
"Americans are planning to Avoid Sugar and Eat More Sustainably in 2018, Says Survey from Label Insight", News release, Label Insight, January 04, 2018, © Label Insight
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Demand For Bioplastics Is Growing, But Still Not Competitive With Petrochemicals

January 2, 2018: 12:00 AM EST
Packaging that uses bioplastics made from sugar cane, wood, and corn – instead of petrochemical-based plastics – is expected to grow by 50 percent by 2023. Several big bioplastics companies have entered the packaging segment to meet growing demands for more eco-friendly bottles and other containers from companies like Coca-Cola and Lego A/S. A research group that focuses on the oil industry says the trend is troubling news for the oil industry because the use of biochemicals and bioplastics will depress demand for oil-based containers, “much like recycling can erode overall virgin plastics demand.” But industry watchers say demand for bioplastics packaging will have to increase significantly – not just from Coca-Cola, but from consumers and retailers – to compete effectively against oil-based plastics.
Anna Hirtenstein, "Oil's Dream to Grow in Plastics Dims as Coke Turns to Plants", Bloomberg, January 02, 2018, © Bloomberg L.P.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

U.K. Supermarket Store Gives Away Cartloads Of Unsold Holiday Produce

December 30, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
An Asda supermarket branch in Wales decided it didn’t want to waste the unsold produce accumulated over the holidays. It created a sensation in the Barry community as shopping carts full of leftover carrots, broccoli, parsnips, and brussels sprouts were given away free of charge to surprised and happy shoppers. Some of the food was collected for the homeless, charities, soup kitchens or owners of livestock. Store managers at other Asda outlets apparently were free to do the same thing at their own discretion. [ Image credit: © Aled Williams/Wales Online  ]
Tom Houghton et al., "Supermarket Gives Away Trolley-Loads of Free Food Left Over from Christmas to Make Sure Nothing Goes to Waste", Mirror (U.K.), December 30, 2017, © MGN Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Fermentation Of Veggies: One Tactic In War On Food Waste

December 27, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A farm family in Maine has hit upon a healthful and tasty solution to the food waste, especially vegetable waste, problem. Each day they take vegetables from their farm that were not sold at the local farmers market and ferment them using brine, or just salt, in jars stored for later consumption. Fermented vegetables are filled with nutrients, digestive enzymes and "good bacteria" known as probiotics, as are other fermented foods like kombucha, kefir, yogurt, and beet kvass (fermented beet juice). Says Mary Margaret Ripley: “It's inexpensive, it's a way to use extra vegetables before they go bad, and it results in healthy, flavorful food.” [ Image credit: © Wikimedia  ]
Aislinn Sarnacki, "How to Reduce Waste with Fermented Vegetables", Bangor Daily News, December 27, 2017, © The Bangor Publishing Co
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Westrock’s Packaging For Carlsberg Beer Line Is Certified By Cradle To Cradle

December 26, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. corrugated paper and packaging company WestRock is working with Danish brewer Carlsberg Group to provide eco-friendly primary and secondary beverage packaging for its beer brands. The WestRock 6-pack carton for Kronenbourg 1664, made from Carrier Kote Coated Natural Kraft paperboard, received Cradle to Cradle Bronze certification.  The durable material provides sharp, clear printed graphics and optimal protection to the glass bottles. Nonprofit Cradle to Cradle’s Certified Product Standard guides designers and manufacturers through five quality categories: material health, material reutilization, renewable energy and carbon management, water stewardship, and social fairness.
"WestRock Product Granted Cradle to Cradle Certification for Beverage Packaging", BevNET, December 26, 2017, © BevNET.com
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
Denmark

Harnessing Information/Communication Technology To Study Food Sharing

December 21, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Though urban food-sharing initiatives are gaining momentum in the U.S., not much is known about the impact of activities on cities or on the nation as a whole. There is very little data that can be shared with municipal governments or with the citizenry. ShareCity is trying to plug that data gap by collating information on the nearly 4,000 initiatives – especially those using information and communication technologies – identified in 100 cities in 43 countries. It created a project website with an accessible online database. The organization found that food sharing occurs not only in urban areas celebrated for being “smart cities,” but also in cities facing immense social, economic and environmental challenges. Ultimately, the database allows for more consistent and comparable analysis of how food sharing is accomplished globally.  [ Image credit: © Airdrie Food Bank  ]
"Food Sharing as a Means to Reduce Waste and Boost Urban Sustainability", Phys.org, December 21, 2017, © Phys.org
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Research & Findings
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom

Pork Suppliers Say They Have Greatly Reduced Reliance On Antibiotics

December 19, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The National Pork Board, which represents the 60,000 pig farmers in the U.S., says its constituents have made great strides in reducing the use of antibiotics while continuing to protect the health and welfare of pigs. Data from the USDA support the progress, says NPB President Terry O'Neel, a Nebraska pig farmer, though figures for antibiotic use are not species-specific. Nevertheless, USDA numbers show that America's pig farmers produced over five million more market hogs in 2016 than in 2009, as market weights increased by 16 pounds. The figures suggest that pig farmers are using far less total antibiotics per pound of pork produced, and are using them in close cooperation with veterinarians to ensure that they are FDA-approved.  [ Image credit: © Modern Farmer  ]
"Antibiotic Use in Farm Animals Drops", AgriNews, December 19, 2017, © agrinews-pubs.com
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Big Grocery Chains Can Do A Lot To Reduce Food Waste

December 19, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Three business and management scholars writing in the Harvard Business Review suggest several ways large food retailers – Kroger, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Carrefour, Walmart, etc. – can help reduce food waste in their supply chain, stores, and communities. The four-pronged strategy includes the following suggestions: upgrade inventory systems with the latest technology; partner with farms, where seven percent of U.S. produce is left unharvested; modify or eliminate traditional store practices that increase waste, e.g., focusing too heavily on the cosmetics of produce; and team up with consumers, only three percent of whom attach a social stigma to throwing away food. [ Image credit: © Walmart  ]
Yasemin Y. Kor et al., "How Large Food Retailers Can Help Solve the Food Waste Crisis", Harvard Business Review, December 19, 2017, © Harvard Business School Publishing
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe

Mass. Cage-Free Eggs Law Is Targeted By 13 States In Supreme Court Suit

December 18, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Led by Indiana, thirteen states have sued Massachusetts in the U.S. Supreme Court to prevent enforcement of a state law that bans the sale of eggs produced by caged chickens, and meats from caged pigs or calves. A similar action is being pursued by states against California and its cage-free law. The plaintiffs claim that Massachusetts is attempting to impose its own regulatory standards on farmers in other states, in violation of the commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution. The Massachusetts law defines an overly restrictive cage as one that would prevent an egg-laying hen, breeding pig or calf raised for veal from standing up, turning around or fully extending its limbs.  [ Image credit: © Eggland's Best  ]
"13 States Sue to Stop Cage Free Eggs Law in Massachusetts", Daily News, December 18, 2017, via The Associated Press, © The Associated Press
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Morton Salt Attacks Food Waste With Consumer Education Campaign

December 18, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Morton Salt has launched a campaign to educate consumers about food waste and “create opportunities for broad-scale change.” The “Erase Food Waste” campaign includes a video directed by Oscar-nominated director Bryan Buckley that will be shown on digital and social platforms during the holiday season. The integrated campaign also includes out-of-home advertising, chef and influencer partnerships, and educational tools. At the heart of the campaign is the "Questions" video series, which sheds light on the food waste epidemic through biting social commentary. The idea is to challenge viewers to question the behaviors that lead to food waste at home, dining out or when shopping. The videos feature tongue-in-cheek scenarios that pivot to a powerful ending. [ Image credit: © Morton Salt  ]
"Morton Salt is Getting Salty About Food Waste", News release, Morton Salt, December 18, 2017, © Morton Salt
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Marketing & Advertising
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Proper Marketing Could Boost Foods Made With Discarded Ingredients

December 14, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A Drexel University study found strong evidence that value-added surplus food products (VASP) – made from discarded ingredients – would find consumer acceptance and even preference. In addition, the researchers said, converting surplus foods into value-added products would feed people, create opportunities for employment and for entrepreneurship, and lower the environmental impact of wasted resources. Specifically, the study found that participants: identified value-added foods as a unique category, separate from organic and conventional foods; preferred the label terms upcycled and reprocessed to other terms, such as rescued or reclaimed; and said consuming value-added products will generate greater benefits to others than themselves.  [ Image credit: © Sofi Pechner/Martha Stewart  ]
Will Chu, "Finding Value in Surplus Food: Study Finds High Levels of Consumer Acceptance", FOODnavigator.com, December 14, 2017, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Reduction Of Food Waste Is Only One Benefit Of N.Y. City App

December 12, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
New York-based goMkt, which provides a multi-channel, end-to-end smartphone platform to manage food and organics waste streams, has launched a food shopping app designed to match consumers with retailers offering discounted food that could otherwise go to waste. Participating retailers advertise on the app in the form of discounted "flash sales." Once an offer is published, goMkt users can then make a purchase before heading to the retailer to pick up their items. Transactions are completed electronically, and thus seamlessly. Aside from the savings – and helping to reduce food waste – consumers connect with their favorite stores to easily find discounts and specialty items, as well as discovering new locations.  [ Image credit: © goMkt  ]
"With U.S. Food Waste Topping $200 Billion a Year, goMkt Launches New Service ", News release, goMkt, December 12, 2017, © goMkt
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Consumers
Marketing & Advertising
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

When It Comes To Diet Sodas, Moderate Imbibing Is Fine

December 12, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A pediatric physician/researcher says consumers needn’t worry too much about drinking a Diet Coke once in a while. Aaron Carroll M.D. writes in “The Bad Food Bible” that if someone has a yen for a soft drink, a diet version is a better health choice, because the danger is “incredibly small.” It’s better to skip the sugar, which has been strongly linked to diabetes and obesity. Artificial sweeteners just haven’t been scientifically proven to be harmful to humans. However, a researcher who specializes in the health effect of artificial sweeteners says studies have  shown that regular ingestion has been linked to Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, strokes, dementia and obesity. But she agrees that a Diet Coke once in a while is okay..  [ Image credit: © Amazon  ]
Hannah Sparks, "Diet Coke Might Not Be So Bad For Your Health After All", New York Post, December 12, 2017, © NYP HOLDINGS, INC.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

How Online Grocery Shopping Could Worsen Food Waste Problem

December 4, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The increase in the number of online food grocery options may exacerbate America’s food waste problem: 130 billion pounds of food are wasted a year. Online grocery sales are growing at an incredible pace. Amazon’s U.S. grocery sales, for example, surged 93 percent year-on-year to $575 million in the third quarter of 2017. But a new scientific paper by a Hofstra University professor says that trend could make the food waste problem even worse. Consumers shopping in a store invest energy and time buying food, and feel responsible for its use and disposal. But with online food purchases, that energy is transferred to the store’s employees. This impacts the “psychological ownership” of the food, reducing responsibility. And that leads to food waste. [ Image credit: © Wharton  ]
Stephen Daniells, "Could e-Commerce Boost Food Waste vs Conventional Retail?", FOODnavigator-USA.com, December 04, 2017, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Book Provides Details Of Humane “Clean Meat” Technology

November 30, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A new book, available for purchase in January, details the advanced technology behind “clean meat,” animal-based protein that is produced in a bioreactor using living cells from cattle. The cells are replicated to produce food-grade beef, bypassing the necessity of killing and butchering animals. The technology could redefine the entire animal agriculture industry, resulting in meat, eggs and dairy products that are identical to familiar animal protein foods. The new book is Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World, by Paul Shapiro, vice-president of policy at the Humane Society of the United States. [ Image credit: © Cleanmeat.com  ]
Lisa Kramer, "‘Clean Meat’ could be a Major Revolution for the Agriculture Sector", The Globe and Mail, November 30, 2017, © The Globe and Mail Inc.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Innovation
Research & Findings
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

British Government Issues New Standards On Food Storage

November 29, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The British government and anti-waste organizations have issued an advisory on ways to cut food waste through better storage practices. Supermarkets will be expected to use a new Little Blue Fridge icon for foods that should be kept chilled at home, or benefit from being kept in the fridge to prevent them going bad. The icon will be placed on many foods not typically kept in the refrigerator, including fruits like apples, pears, and oranges. In addition, supermarkets should only select a Use By date when there is a food safety concern. A Best Before date should be used otherwise. Stores must also include only one date label on any product, and no Display Until date. The anti-waste charity Wrap says businesses are also exploring whether the Open Life date on bagged salads could be extended so people would have an extra day to eat the salad once opened.  [ Image credit: © Wikimedia  ]
Katie Morley, "Keep Apples and Oranges in the Fridge and Not in the Fruit Bowl, New Guidance Says", The Telegraph, November 29, 2017, © Telegraph Media Group Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Other
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Reports Illustrate Magnitude Of Food Waste Problem In U.S.

November 25, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Two new reports make the case that an “outrageous amount of food is wasted in our cities,” and could instead be redirected to feed the hungry. Data from the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Rockefeller Foundation show that 68 million more meals annually could potentially be donated to people in need across New York City, Denver, and Nashville. The reports provide detail on how much food is wasted in the home, how cities could increase food donations to the poor, and how food waste problems could be tackled at a city level nationwide. The NRDC also published case studies of innovations by government agencies, nonprofits and private companies that seek to address hunger, reduce waste, and create jobs.  [ Image credit: © Wikipedia  ]
Kate Kiely, "Two-Thirds of Food Wasted at Home in Three Major U.S. Cities is Edible", Natural Resources Defense Council, November 25, 2017, © Natural Resources Defense Council
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Efficiency & Business Processes
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Carlsberg Brewery In Sweden Is Powered By Green Electricity, Biogas

November 24, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The Carlsberg Sverige brewery in Falkenberg, Sweden, is now powered 100 percent by biogas and green electricity. Under Carlsberg’s sustainability program (“Together Toward Zero”), a goal is to reduce carbon emissions to zero from all of its breweries, and a 30 percent reduction in the beer-in-hand carbon footprint by 2030. Achieving that goal will involve the use of fully renewable electricity in its breweries and the elimination of coal as a source of energy by 2022.
"Carlsberg Group Ready with First Carbon-Neutral Brewery", News release, Carlsberg Group, November 24, 2017, © Carlsberg Breweries A/S
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Denmark
Sweden

Chinese Beverage Industry Honors Pepsi-Tingyi Bottlers For Conservation Efforts

November 23, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Bottlers and other production plants that are part of the PepsiCo-Tingyi alliance beverage system in China were recognized for water and energy conservation efforts at the 2017 China Beverage Industry Association (CBIA ) annual conference recently. PepsiCo and Tingyi won nearly 40 percent of the total awards at the conference, continuing a tradition of industry awards over many years. This year, 20 alliance plants won Excellent Water Saving Enterprise awards, and 26 received Outstanding Energy Conservation Enterprise awards.
"PepsiCo-Tingyi Alliance Wins Big at CBIA 2017 Awards", Global Times, November 23, 2017, © Global Times
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
China

London Tests Buses Powered By Coffee Beans

November 20, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Some of London’s buses are being powered by a biofuel made with 20 percent coffee oil. The concoction provides a cleaner, more sustainable energy solution for buses across London's network by decreasing emissions, according to collaborators Royal Dutch Shell and bio-bean, which has pioneered the use of coffee grounds as a source of clean-burning fuel, including bio-mass pellets and briquettes called Coffee Logs. Bio-bean founder Arthur Kay says the bus fuel initiative is an example of what can be accomplished “when we start to reimagine waste as an untapped resource."  [ Image credit: © Wikipedia  ]
"Shell, Bio-Bean and Coffee-Drinkers Collaborate to Help Power London's Buses", News release, Royal Dutch Shell, November 20, 2017, © Royal Dutch Shell
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Postsecondary Schools Will Collaborate In Training Food Waste-Conscious Chefs

November 15, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Philadelphia’s Drexel University is collaborating with other colleges and universities to develop a curriculum whose mission is to reduce food waste in restaurants by training educators to inspire and teach culinary students to minimize food waste. Of the $218 billion in food waste – 63 million tons – annually, a third is wasted by restaurants and commercial foodservice businesses. The Drexel project is supported by the James Beard Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, and will involve other schools, including New York University, the Academy of Culinary Arts, Boston University, and Colorado State University.  [ Image credit: © Drexel University  ]
Emily Storz, "Training the Next Generation of Chefs and Culinary Professionals to Reduce Food Waste", News release, Drexel University, November 15, 2017, © Drexel University
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

U.K. Bread Waste Activists Turn Toast Into Propaganda

November 13, 2017: 12:00 AM EST

A campaign by a London newspaper inspired two advertising professionals to get serious about food waste, especially the wasteful disposal of uneaten bread. They developed a campaign of their own called Edible Leaflets in which they “toast facts on how to waste less onto slices of bread and give them out in London.” The idea was to inscribe fun facts or slogans about food waste on the bread and hand them out on the streets of the city. The toasted slices offered crumbs of wisdom like “1 in 3 slices binned,” “1 slice for every human on earth,” “never too old to make croutons,” and “feed me to the ducks,” all designed to “get people’s attention by tackling the problem” – wasted bread – “in a fun way.”  [ Image credit: © Edible Leaflets  ]

Victoria Stewart, "Meet the Duo Tackling London's Food Waste Problem Head-On with Edible Leaflets", Evening Standard, November 13, 2017, © Standard.co.UK
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Ingredients
Innovation
Product News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

USDA, U.S. Pork Producers, Slam WHO Guidelines On Antibiotics Use

November 10, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The World Health Organization says that reductions in the use of antibiotics in food animals would reduce antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the meat production chain by as much as 39 percent. WHO recently published guidelines that proposed ending the use of antibiotics in food animals for disease prevention and growth promotion. Specifically, the organization proposed complete restriction of use of all classes of medically important antimicrobials in food-producing animals for prevention of infectious diseases that have not yet been clinically diagnosed. USDA acting chief scientist Chavonda Jacobs-Young said the new guidelines “are not in alignment with U.S. policy and are not supported by sound science.” The National Pork Producers Council also expressed strong disagreement with WHO’s guidelines.  [ Image credit: © Sintef  ]
P. Scott Shearer, "WHO Proposes Ending Antibiotics for Prevention in Food Animals", National Hog Farmer, November 10, 2017, © Penton
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Ingredients
Regulation & Government
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Switzerland

Onsite Digestion Machine Could Help Restaurants Convert Food Waste To Power

November 10, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A start-up company that was spun off from a British university has developed a prototype of an onsite anaerobic digestion machine that uses microbes to convert restaurant and hospital food waste to biogas. The gas can then be used to create electricity for heat or power. The U.K. has more than 200 anaerobic digestion plants, but this is the first onsite solution. The entrepreneur who developed the prototype and launched the company out of her doctoral research is seeking the funding needed to commercialize the project within a year.  [ Image credit: © IntelliDigest  ]
"University Spin-Out Turns Food into Electricity", Heriot-Watt University, November 10, 2017, © Heriot-Watt University
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Efficiency & Business Processes
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Foods Meet FDA Pesticide Residue Standards That May Be Badly Out Of Date

November 8, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
The FDA reported that almost all domestic food, and 90 percent of imported food, it had tested was free of pesticides residues. Foods tested included almonds, fish, milk, soybeans, apples, cabbage, etc. Pesticide chemical residues were higher than federal tolerance levels in less than two percent – 15 out of 835 – of domestic food samples and less than 10 percent of import samples. However, the FDA tolerance levels may be too low, since they are usually set for healthy adult males, and they are years out of date anyway. They should be higher for pregnant women and children, according to the Pesticide Action Network, which advocates buying organic foods when possible.[ Image credit: © Wikipedia  ]
Susan Salisbury, "Pesticides in Our Food Supply: What the Latest FDA Report Found", Palm Beach Post, November 08, 2017, © Cox Media Group
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Regulation & Government
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

British Chefs Donate Waste For Composting, Then Growing Produce For Restaurants

November 5, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
A self-styled “food waste farmer” is teaching British chefs to rent plots of land, donate their waste food for composting, then grow crops for use by their restaurants. About ten London chefs are renting 1,100-square-foot gardens owned by Indie Ecology, which are worked by farmers to organically grow whatever fruits, vegetables, and flowers the chefs want. The goal of former chef Igor Vaintraub is to help transform the way chefs think and act about their impact on nature and the environment.  [ Image credit: © Vermont Compost Company  ]
"Plotting to convert waste into taste", The Sunday Telegraph (London), November 05, 2017, © Telegraph Media Group Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

An Expanding Global Population Requires Smarter Agriculture, Food Engineering

November 5, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
As world population grows by 83 million people annually, by 2030 there will be a billion more people to feed on planet Earth. That can’t be accomplished without some serious innovation in food production and agriculture. The solution entails advanced technology and "precision agriculture" – digital solutions and advanced data analytics – that would boost crop production efficiency and improve yields, cuts costs, and increase crop resilience. Use of drones and robotics would reduce labor and energy intensity with remote, automated crop monitoring. Another way to expand the food base is by engineering meat protein that tastes like the real thing but requires much less land to produce than beef.  [ Image credit: © Whole Foods Market  ]
Alison Coleman, "From Plantburgers to Cutting Food Waste: How to Feed the Next Billion", Raconteur, November 05, 2017, © Raconteur Media Ltd.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Efficiency & Business Processes
Innovation
Product News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom

Food Donations Up 20 Percent In Italy Since 2016 Food Waste Law

November 3, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Italians are donating 20 percent more food to charities since the enactment of a law designed to curb food waste, a politician says. The law, which went into effect in September 2016, expanded the types of foods that could be donated beyond products with a long shelf life. Cooked food, fruits and vegetables, much of it sourced from produce markets, cruise ships, and sporting events. can now be donated to the needy, said Maria Chiara Gadda.  [ Image credit: © Forgotten Harvest  ]
"Donations Up 20% after Food-Waste Law", ANSA, November 03, 2017, © ANSA
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Regulation & Government
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Italy

Lucozade Could Replace Its Unrecyclable Drinks Packaging

November 2, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
British beverage company Lucozade Ribena Suntory says it is assessing what it can do about its purportedly unrecyclable drinks packaging. The U.K. Recycling Association recently singled out the company’s Lucozade Sport bottle as one of the worst offenders in the food and beverage packaging industry because it is “so confusing to computer scanners” and “often just gets chucked away.” In addition, the polymer sleeve the brand uses can be recycled, but only at one center in the U.K. After a dressing down by a government environmental committee, the company said it was meeting with recycling experts to find a solution to the problem.
Sid Hayns-Worthington, "Lucozade Poised to Change ‘Villainous’ Packaging after Recycling Criticism", Resource, November 02, 2017, © Resource Media Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Efficiency & Business Processes
Product News
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

It’s Official: Hydroponic Cultivation Is Organic

November 2, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Organic farmers are hopping mad over a recent 8-7 decision – a final ruling, in fact – by the National Organic Standards board that vegetables grown hydroponically do not violate the principles of organic farming. The farmers argue that organic farming is all about “soil health, regenerating the soil,” and not about growing vegetables in nutrient-filled fluids. Hydroponic farmers, however, say their methods are more environmentally sound. Tomatoes, for example, can be grown with three to five gallons of water per pound of production. Growing tomatoes in open fields can use up to 37 gallons of water. Open field cultivation "uses more water, more land, destroys more natural habitat. I mean, what is the true essence of organic?" The government-appointed board advises the USDA on rules for the organic industry.  [ Image credit: © NDSU  ]
Dan Charles, "Hydroponic Veggies Are Taking Over Organic, And A Move To Ban Them Fails", National Public Radio, November 02, 2017, © npr
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Consumers
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

P&G To Spend $2.5M On Solar Panels For Chinese Pampers Factory

November 1, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Procter & Gamble Co. announced plans to invest $2.5 million in upgrading the electrical system at a Pampers factory in Luogang, China, with 8,500 rooftop solar panels. The system, which is expected to reduce both energy costs and pollution, will be designed, built, and maintained by Asia Clean Capital, which will also will cover all of the expense of the equipment. The solar panels will cut the plant’s sulfur dioxide emissions by 22 tons, carbon dioxide emissions by 34,733 tons, and water consumption by 64,835 tons over the life cycle.  [ Image credit: ©  Pampers  ]
Barrett J. Brunsman , "P&G to install massive solar power system at plant", bizjournals.com , November 01, 2017, © American City Business Journals
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Australian Scientists Create Machine That Turns Unsold Produce Into Healthy Snacks

October 31, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists at Australia’s national science agency CSIRO have developed an extrusion machine that can turn agricultural food waste into healthy snacks, cooking ingredients, soup premixes, etc. Powders produced [left] can be used in smoothies, dips, sauces, spreads, pasta, noodles, or bakery items. Growers could use the machine to generate a secondary income line by turning unharvested produce – e.g., broccoli or carrots – that might otherwise be left on the field into high-value food ingredients or healthy snack products, scientists said. According to CSIRO, the machine is ready for commercialization; the agency is demonstrating it to growers to determine the level of interest. [ Image credit: © Chloe Smith / The Weekly Times  ]
Lyndal Reading, "Food Waste: Excess Crops Become Base for Healthy Snacks", The Weekly Times, October 31, 2017, © The Herald & Weekly Times Pty Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia

Food Retailer Partners With Iowa Farmers To Obtain GMO-Free Pork

October 30, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
California food retailer Raley's has launched a program to offer non-GMO and antibiotics-free pork in its stores. The company has partnered with supplier American Homestead Pork, a group of 35 family farms in Iowa whose animals have never been given antibiotics or growth-promoting chemicals, and have never been caged. Family-owned Raley’s says it now offers more than 15,000 natural and organic foods. [ Image credit: © Raley's  ]
Alissa Marchat, "Raley’s Partners With American Homestead To Offer GMO-Free Pork", The Shelby Report, October 30, 2017, © The Shelby Report
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Re-Used Bread Offers Many Benefits, Including Waste Reduction

October 30, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Disturbed by the amount of bread wasted around the world every year – about 1.2 million tons – a New Zealand university professor figured out a way to take unsold bread from supermarkets and make new loaves. Collaborating with food company Goodman Fielder, Aydin Berenjian [left] developed a day-long process that produces one ton of fermented bread that has a high profile of essential amino acids, high resistance starch, and a higher shelf life – up to seven days. It tastes like a cross between white bread and sourdough, and because the microbes used in the fermentation system are all probiotics, the bread benefits the digestive and immune systems.  [ Image credit: © University of Waikato  ]
Caitlin Moorby, "Researcher Recycles Stale Bread Into New Loaves", Stuff, October 30, 2017, © Fairfax New Zealand Limited
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia
New Zealand

Big Food Agrees To Clarify Food Expiration Labels

October 26, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Fifty of the biggest players in the food industry, led by Campbell, Walmart, Kellogg, and Nestlé, are changing their expiration labels exclusively to “Use By” over the next three years. That means that by 2020, consumers will not have to deal with confusing labels that say “Sell By,” “Display Until,” or “Best Before.” The companies, all members of the Consumer Goods Forum Board, unanimously approved the change after concluding that confusing labeling that leads to premature disposal is one of the leading causes of food waste around the world. About 40 percent of food that is bought in the U.S. is thrown out often unnecessarily. About 1.3 billion tons of food are wasted annually around the world, contributing to eight percent of greenhouse gases. [ Image credit: © General Mills  ]
Leanna Garfield, "Walmart and Nestlé are spearheading a Massive Change in Food Expiration Dates", Business Insider, October 26, 2017, © Business Insider Inc.
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Geographies
Worldwide

NRDC Pinpoints Sources, Amounts Of Food Waste In Three U.S. Cities

October 25, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
New Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) research explores how much food is being wasted in Denver, Nashville, and New York City, as well as where and why food is discarded, what types of food are wasted, and how much of that food was potentially edible. NRDC says food is the largest component of waste sent landfills in the U.S. –  nearly 22 percent. Organic solid waste in landfills generates the global warming pollutant methane. But it also indicates how much water, land, energy, money, labor, and other resources are being wasted in growing, processing, distributing, and storing that food. For the study, NRDC collected data from each city’s restaurants, food wholesalers, food manufacturers, grocers, and hotels. Six hundred households kept track of discarded food for a week. [ Image credit: © True Activist  ]
Darby Hoover, "What, Where and How Much Food Is Wasted in Cities", Blog entry and report, Natural Resources Defense Council, October 25, 2017, © Natural Resources Defense Council
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Market News
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Nestle Bolsters Commitment To More Eco-Friendly Water Usage

October 25, 2017: 12:00 AM EST
Seeking to quell environmental criticism of its water packaging and transport practices, Nestlé SA announced it is strengthening ties with the Alliance for Water Stewardship, whose certification process involves committing to improve water usage and gather data on water collection. The AWS will monitor whether 20 sites meet its standards on water use by 2020. Four of Nestlé’s water bottling plants in Pakistan and California are AWS-certified. Bottled water competitor Danone recently said it plans to make Evian the first major carbon-neutral spring water brand.
Corinne Gretler and Robert Williams, "Nestle Seeks Sustainable Label for More Water-Bottling Sites", Bloomberg , October 25, 2017, © Bloomberg LP
Domains
SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
Company News
Efficiency & Business Processes
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Europe
Pakistan
Switzerland
<<12345678910>> Total results:1401 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.